the science of cooking book review

(White) chocolate chip cookies, recipe from The Science of Good Cooking, photo by Ariane Coffin. The information itself is amazing - "How do we taste" provides myths versus truths, and the author describes why we taste (example: we taste bitter because it triggers a range of potentially harmful natural toxic substances). In this book Dr. Farrimond presents a book on the science of food that is easy to understand. It has done pretty well for itself, as it rightfully deserves in my opinion. Also, there was just great information all around about the different ingredients as well - I never knew that rice grows bacteria and is not the safest option to be eaten as leftovers! Dr. Stuart Farrimond is a science and medical writer, presenter, and educator. This book is very well laid out - sort of like a good text book. I will never look at food the same way again. The Science of Good Cooking, by the Editors of Cook's Illustrated (Cook's Illustrated, $40) Each of the 500-plus pages of this book is devoted to answering one question: Why? I do wish they could be more in depth though, but this still be a worthy book to collect for anyone who love cooking and interested in. Using full-color images, stats and facts through infographics, and an engaging Q&A format to show you how to perfect your cooking, The Science of Cooking brings food science out of the lab and into your kitchen. I love Cooks Illustrated, which delves into the actual science of why recipes work they way they do and I suspected this book would be right up my alley! “Let us remember: One book, one pen, one child, and one teacher can change the world.” If you're new to the kitchen or have been cooking for years, as I have, I think you will learn something new! So many savory recipes call for onions and I hate onions. Disclaimer: I received a review copy of this book. In The Science of Cooking, fundamental culinary concepts sit side-by-side with practical advice and step-by-step techniques, bringing food science out of the lab and into your kitchen. As a child I would avoid them all together. I've talked recently about my favorite science podcasts. Dr Farrimond has a very engaging writing style and his book tells you everything you need to know about kitchen conundrums - from how to avoid soggy-bottomed pies to which utensils to use for the job at hand. Understanding the chemistry and physics of cooking should lead to improvements in performance in the kitchen. The book shares the secrets using science and rules to make out the finest. Start by marking “The Science of Cooking: Every Question Answered to Perfect your Cooking” as Want to Read: Error rating book. With short, to-the-point paragraphs and helpful graphics and photos, this book breaks down not only the science of cooking but the science of FOOD (how a food source's environment affects it's behavior when cooking, etc.). This book is perfect for the beginning Chef or experienced foodie. This book, "The Science of Cooking," is like that too, and it's great. or "why did my cake turn out so lumpy?!" Be the first to ask a question about The Science of Cooking. There are explanations of why some flavors go so well together, descriptions of kitchen essentials and their differences (I was not aware of carbon steel, stainless steel, and ceramic knives and their properties), etc. For those of us who wish to know why certain … Welcome back. It would have been better to leave. News, author interviews, critics' picks … Even before Harold McGee’s groundbreaking 1984 classic On Food and Cooking: the Science and Lore of the Kitchen, Dr. Eduoard de Pomiane (1875–1964), the celebrated French food scientist and cookbook author set out to ease the anxiety of the home cook by demystifying the process. Just received my copy of Dr Stuart Farrimond's new book, "The Science of Cooking". I love Alton Brown's show "Good Eats" because it gets into the WHY of food - why things work certain ways for certain foods. Although it's structured more like an encyclopedia, I approached it as a novel, reading it from beginning to end in one breath. The Science of Cooking is a super cool book that any food and cooking lover will enjoy adding to their kitchen. Get the answers to your cookery questions with intriguing chapters covering all major food types from meat, poultry and seafood, to grains, vegetables, and herbs. Food preparation and cookery involve many processes which are well described by the physical sciences. As you can tell from the photograph at the top of the post, even with all my toddler-free time I couldn't hold my wits together long enough to remember to buy chocolate chips. In cooking, The Science of very good Cooking, written by Sylvia Sykes, is one of the few books on the topic {that is not only going to cause you to a much better cook but will even offer you with methods and techniques for cooking that create a delicious and nutritious meal. The format is colorful and engaging, with tons of color photos and infographics. The Science of Great Cooking Book Review. The WIRED conversation illuminates how technology is changing every aspect of our lives—from culture to business, science to design. If you're not 100% sure how best to poach an egg, how to tell which cut of beef to buy, or how to tame a very hot pepper, then you need this book. Will probably re-read it a few more times throughout the years, simply because of its information-density and my inability to memorize it all at once. Nice layout, but there where objectively wrong facts in there which totally ruined it for me, because then I just couldn't trust anything in there anymore. I'm a bit disappointed that the galley wasn't available in a kindle format, but this is a resource that I need (and anyone interested in cooking!) If interested in the science of cooking, as the title suggests, this is an incredibly good book for it. The Science of Cooking can be just a new publication from famous science writer Tim Ferris. Anyone can get a cookbook for recipes but this book discusses techniques and provides detail information on so many subjects related to cooking. I do wish they could be more in depth though, but this still be a worthy book to collect for anyone who love cooking and interested in understanding more about it. I love to cook and also love science so this book spoke to me on multiple levels. It is the essential source of information and ideas that make sense of a world in constant transformation. I highly recommend it to anyone sharing my interest in cooking, nutrition and science. Topics include meat and poultry, seafood, dairy, pulses and grains, fruits, vegetables, spices, … The Science of Cooking is a super cool book that any food and cooking lover will enjoy adding to their kitchen. If you're a visual learner (as I am), then this book is definitely for. With short, to-the-point paragraphs and helpful graphics and photos, this book breaks down not only the science of cooking but the science of FOOD (how a food source's environment affects it's behavior when cooking, etc.). While marketed as a textbook the blurb states that there are no pre-requisites for … He also is known for television, radio and public appearances. I generally enjoy cooking and am interested in learning why certain methods are used in food preparation so this book fit my interests perfectly. With advice on everything from which type of knife works best for which use, to. Such an interview was on Lab Out Loud with food chemistry expert Guy Crosby, Ph.D., about his book The Science of Good Cooking. Both books are structured very similarly. This is a fantastic book broken down in an easy-to-read manner. The one book on cooking that you will ever need, ever. It has good presentation, although the black text against coloured paper on some pages makes it hard to read unless you are in very good light. Ad Choices. Most of the time I improvise, swapping yogurt for sour cream because that's all I have and hey, dairy is dairy so close enough, right? I also feel like I've gained a bit more confidence in exploring cooking meals with seafood as I tend to play it pretty safe since I don't have enough experience doing it myself even though I enjoy eating it out. And now I know. Just a moment while we sign you in to your Goodreads account. Like many others I learned cooking from watching my parents in the kitchen, I'm finding it incredibly refreshing to find out why some things work the way they do. There are various procedure we carry out in the kitchen simply because we were told to by our mums but the reasons behind these have been lost, forgotten or changed! This book is fantastic! I love Cooks Illustrated, which delves into the actual science of why recipes work they way they do and I suspected this book would be right up my alley! I truly enjoyed this book. My favorite concept section so far has been the "Slicing Changes Garlic and Onion Flavor." DK Publishing is famous for their large books of infographics devoted to all kinds of topics. There are charts, graphs, illustrations of scientific concepts...it's great. I just keep picking up the book when I get a free moment, learning a little bit more about cooking every time. I see this as so much more than a cookbook. The Science of Good Cooking covers the 50 fundamental concepts that we think every good cook should know. If you like the science behind cooking, you're gonna enjoy this. It’s packed with science and practical advice on cooking pretty much everything. He makes regular appearances on BBC TV, on radio, and at public events, and his writing appears in national and international publications, including the Independent, the Daily Mail, and New Scientist. It’s 250 pages filled with information, all formatted with wonderful graphics that educate and entertain. The Science of Cooking is a super cool book that any food and cooking lover will enjoy adding to their kitchen. Dr. Farrimond is a specialist in the area of food science. I love it 💛💛💛. I need a copy of this for my self and for my friends in the sciences and for my friends who cook. Book Reviews - The Science of Cooking by Peter Barham » Have you read this book? For those with younger kids, there's still a lot of information in there that you can pass on while you're making simpler recipes, you just have to do the reading first. Reviewed in the United States on 21 December 2004. You see, the pungent onion flavor happens when the cell walls are ruptured, causing the enzymes in the cell walls to react with the sulfure-containing amino acids inside the cell. If you love to cook and want to understand the details of 'how' and 'why' then this book is for you! If you're a visual learner (as I am), then this book is definitely for you as there are pictures accompanying everything. While marketed as a textbook the blurb states that there are no pre-requisites for the course and the work is appropriate for all college levels. I enjoy cooking but I am definitely not a chef or even feel like I have enough knowledge about the methods and importance of technique. It does not delve into the deep science, but it gives a good, simplified overview and is an easy read for any reader of any science level; however, I cannot give it a full 5-stars as the agriculture side is lacking in research. This is the cookbook I've been looking for! I used to enjoy complicated recipes that call for 68-degree butter, back when I had no kids and unlimited time. However, what is most impressive is the beautiful presentation, which is reminiscent of the nerdy science books I had as a kid. The book, co-authored by Guy Crosby and the editors at America's Test Kitchen, was released in October 2012. For science! Because it is more than a collection of recipes, it's a primer. -NATURE "You do not have to be a chemist or a physicist to cook a meal, any more than you need a qualification in engineering to drive a car; but in both cases, a little technical knowledge can help when things go wrong. It’s 896 pages of content, loaded with science, historical anecdotes (like how a young colonist in 1755 reported that maple syrup was made from the sap using freezing techniques, not heat) and lots of side bars (like the percentage of sugar in some popular candies vs the ratio of sucrose to glucose). I am an avid cook and baker so I was very excited to read this book. However, what is most impressive is the beautiful presentation, which is reminiscent of the nerdy science books I had as a kid. I also feel like I've gained a bit more confidence. The book is a pleasant read and is an invitation to become better acquainted with the science of cooking." One of the best DK books I've ever bought. That is exactly why I will use the book so much, though I will probably rarely find the time to use its perfect recipes. A kitchen is no different from most science laboratories and cookery may properly be regarded as an experimental science. My favorite part is that the books explains why the cookies were amazing, each recipe has a "Why This Recipe Works" section. Verified Purchase. Food preparation and cookery involve many processes which are well described by … If you're new to the kitchen or have been cooking for. As someone who frequently asks "why?" -NATURE "You do not have to be a chemist or a physicist to cook a meal, any more than you need a qualification in engineering to drive a car; but in both cases, a little technical knowledge can help when things go wrong. Understanding the chemistry and physics of cooking should lead to improvements in performance in the kitchen. Book Review: The Science of Good Cooking. NPR coverage of The Science of Good Cooking: Master 50 Simple Concepts to Enjoy a Lifetime of Success in the Kitchen by Cook's Illustrated Magazine. There are no discussion topics on this book yet. October 5th 2017 I listen to them frequently for, amongst other things, the witty banter and the interesting interviews. Speaking of practical considerations, The Science of Good Cooking has a retail list price of $40, but you can pick up a hardcover version on Amazon for around $24, while the Kindle edition is right around $20. I received this book, for free, in exchange for an honest review. Food preparation and cookery involve many processes which are well described by the physical sciences. 8 reviews. Perfect for the teenagers learning their way around a kitchen and the every day cook wishing to learn more about why things work the way they do. Meaning that hacking an onion to bits with a dull knife or food processor will rupture more cell walls and deliver a much stronger onion taste than an onion chopped coarsely with a good sharp knife. should have on their shelves. I've got no time for superstition or tradition in the kitchen if it makes inferior food, so this book is great at coming to the defence of the scientific method for great taste. And it answers all those questions with science. The Science of Cooking by Joseph Provost, Keri Colabroy, Brenda Kelly and Mark Wallert promises to explain the scientific principles of food, cooking and the science of taste and smell. or "why did my cake turn out so lumpy?!" -NATURE "You do not have to be a chemist or a physicist to cook a meal, any more than you need a qualification in engineering to drive a car; but in both cases, a little technical knowledge can help when things go wrong. The page on telling if an egg is too old based on it's angle when dropped into water. There is so much information in this book that even if I'm not willing to give up my lazy ways on some things (I won't be standing at the grill and flipping a steak to get the perfect cook thank you very much), I can at least learn ways to improve some of my meals by simple adjustments. So much information, packaged in a beautifully presented format. I had to try the "Ultimate Chocolate Chip Cookies" recipe first because I'm a cookie maniac. The Science of Cooking: Every Question Answered to Perfect Your Cooking Hardcover – Illustrated, September 19, 2017 by Stuart Dr. Farrimond (Author) 4.8 out … I found this book interesting and informative. But was I going to let one toddler stop me from trying one of these perfected recipes? For example, in the chocolate chip cookie recipe, that section explains why the ratio of white to brown sugar can affect the chewiness, why browning the butter adds a huge amount of flavor, and why the recipe instructs to whisk the warm butter and sugar then letting it sit 10 minutes. All rights reserved. And it answers all those questions with science. The format is colorful and engaging, with tons of color photos and infographics. The very real, very important complex grey areas of organic, grass-fed, animal welfare, and antibiotic use are not mentioned at all. This is a must-have book for anyone interested in the culinary arts. I substituted white chocolate chips for semisweet chocolate chips because that's what I already had, and hoped for the best. Let us know what’s wrong with this preview of, Published Refresh and try again. I see this as so much more than a cookbook. It's a lovely book, well illustrated and provides many interesting facts that we don't see in regular cookbooks.

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